autisticalice: (Default)
 I want to fit in the sounds that an autistic person makes. Some of them tend to make odd noises. I make them at home in my room when I get excited. I want to be able to explain them in a way that the makes the reader able to understand. The problem is that most of these noises are really complicated and harder to understand. 

I don't know, I may not. I mean, right now i need to figure out the plot for the fanfiction project I told you guys about. I haven't really had much progress since I met a new friend and plus, other things.So yeah... so many constant distractions. Honestly, I hate having ADHD and autism at the same time. I've gotten so used to taking my concerta that i don't want to do anything with it. I guess I could get a higher dose but... my insurance sucks... they mess things up and... ugh.

I think half the problem is that I get distracted by routine and emotional reasons. It's not that I'm distracted for the sake of ADHD. That's the trouble with having both. =.= But yeah... it's time I worked on my project.

Yay!

Date: 2012-09-30 08:30 am (UTC)From: [personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
>>I want to fit in the sounds that an autistic person makes. Some of them tend to make odd noises.<<

I would love this! I am a hobby-linguist, so I'm really into sounds that people or other living creatures make.

>> The problem is that most of these noises are really complicated and harder to understand. <<

Okay, there are resources for describing sounds. How-to articles on onamatopoeia for writers can be good but it's hard to find the best ones.

A decent book on basic linguistics -- or you might have something like this from your speech therapy -- will describe all the human phonemes along with how the lips and tongue move to make sounds. This is really handy if you are dealing with sounds outside the English language.

Another excellent resource is zoology guidebooks for birds or animals that describe their calls. You can really see how to write out unusual sounds with English letters. I recommend the Cornell birding website:
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/Page.aspx?pid=1189
It has awesome descriptions of birds, their sounds, and sound files so you can hear them. That's not a random example; I can whistle well enough to get a cardinal to answer me, and I've written bird calls into my fiction where necessary.

>>I think half the problem is that I get distracted by routine and emotional reasons. It's not that I'm distracted for the sake of ADHD.<<

Not much to do about that but practice getting things done. Sometimes it helps to set a reward for finishing a project. But everyone has some part of a project they suck at -- it's just starting for some people, and finishing for others, and so forth. There actually is an advantage to starting more things than you finish: anything that holds your interest to the end is far more likely to keep a reader or an editor hooked too.

Re: Yay!

Date: 2012-10-01 08:40 am (UTC)From: [personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
>>The squealing noises I make are more like an "eeeeeeeee" or something.<<

I strongly suspect that's the origin of "squee" that has entered common usage in recent years.

>>They tend to be pretty high-pitched at times. I just want people to see the lighter side of autism and that all these things we do are normal for us.<<

That's a great idea.

>>Sometimes it can be whole different language we use when we can't speak.<<

Fascinating! I have a much wider concept of "language" than most humans do.

>>Since she likes animals, it would make sense for her to make their sounds.<<

Good idea.

>>But she's able to communicate so if anything, these sounds would be more comforting and calming to her than used in actual communication.<<

Or when the best way to say something is not in English. My ordinary vocabulary contains a fair sprinkling of words from foreign languages, words from invented languages, useful linguistic noises, animal sounds, etc. It's one thing to speak a foreign language when you're with somebody for whom it's native -- I'm able to carry on a conversation with dogs or wolves, for instance -- and another to drop foreign words into your own language, but most people who speak multiple languages will codeswitch between them at least occasionally. Works the same if they're not all human languages.

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